Houston Press: Gentrification is Not A Good Thing for African American Communities

Full article by G. Paris Johnson


It took me a minute to piece this together because I had to listen to the interviews again to capture the raw, unfiltered emotions. If you're looking to experience gentrification in its most raw and pure form, you've got to check out the Project Row houses installation Round 47—it is here until February 11, 2018. Round 47 is located in the heart of Third Ward at 2521 Holman.

This group of talented artists offers a visual articulation ranging from sculpting, painting, cinemaphotography, choreography, and photography. Each installation captures the effects gentrification has on the residents of Third Ward.

"We make it work! We work with what we got. We are resilient. We can. We do. We are.", says photographer and cinematographer, Brian Ellison artist of the "We are Enough [Still]" installation.

art21: The Poetry of Everyday Life: An Interview with Project Row Houses Director Eureka Gilkey

Full article by Lindsey Davis


Lindsey Davis: How do you balance PRH’s arts initiatives with the social services it provides? Is there a magic formula for providing both?

Eureka Gilkey: For the most part, Project Row Houses doesn’t directly provide social services. We are focused on long-term, sustainable development for both individuals and ideas. The closest program to direct services would be our Young Mothers Residential Program (YMRP), which empowers low-income single mothers and their children to achieve self-sufficient lives while fostering a sense of interdependence: the idea that you can lean on others in the community and be there for them to lean on, too. Many people confuse us for a social-service organization because our work has a similar effect, of neighborhood transformation, but we consider such effects to come through the process of developing a social sculpture. A more successful, equipped neighborhood is the sculpture we are building together, and that requires access to resources as well as creative thinking and drawing new patterns.

2018 CASE-PRH Fellowship Call for Applications

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Project Row Houses (PRH) and the Center for Art and Social Engagement (CASE) at The Kathrine G. McGovern College of the Arts (KGMCA) at the University of Houston are pleased to announce the call for applications for the 2018 CASE-PRH Fellowship. First developed last year, this is a multi-year program that builds on PRH’s history of leadership in social practice and community-engaged art projects.

As the pilot year comes to a close, PRH and CASE are seeking two new Fellows – one local to Houston and one non-local individual - already engaged in this work whose practice would benefit from a mentorship and year-long engagement with Project Row Houses and UH’s Center for Art & Social Engagement. 

The fellowship program brings artists, cultural practitioners, urban planners, educators, and policymakers to engage with the PRH process and the greater Houston community. Through the program, our goals are to educate and empower the next generation of leaders in socially engaged art and activism, disseminate a known successful practice, and seed discourse across the nation. 

Benefits of the program include: 

  • a stipend of $15,000,
  • $5,000 project/research budget, 
  • a community Brain Trust of local artists, community members, and faculty to advise and ground the project in a local discourse, and
  • for non-Houston Fellows local housing at Project Row Houses with $1,000 in travel support

In return, the fellows are asked to engage our communities – Third Ward, university, artistic, and myriad other – in a process that involves:

  • A public presentation of previous work and Fellowship guiding questions at the beginning of the Fellowship 
  • Present a public talk/project at the end of residency 
  • Co-organize a Community Conversation with PRH Curator and Programs Director and CASE Director 
  • Attend monthly meetings with the program directors

The application consists of a brief narrative, no more than two pages, that addresses the following: 

  • What will be the guiding questions for your work in this fellowship? 
  • What would this fellowship with UH & PRH allow for that you have not yet investigated/achieved?

In support of the primary questions above, please address these ideas:  

  • How does this investigation build upon your history of community engagement?
  • How will the fellowship contribute to the development of your creative career?
  • What are your leadership strengths, and how will the fellowship either complement or enhance those strengths?
  • In what ways can the university community support/enhance your creative investigation?
  • In what ways can PRH support your ongoing practice in the field?
  • For non-resident applicants, please include an ideal timeline for your Fellowship keeping in mind the practicalities of your existing commitments and the Fellowship stipend and travel budget. Would you move to Houston for the entire year, stay for multiple months at a time, or conduct consistent week-long visits? We will take your commitments and the needs of our communities into consideration.

Additionally, applicants will submit a resume/curriculum vitae and samples of previous work for use in contextualizing your work to our stakeholders. The application can be completed online. Please submit all materials by November 21, 2017. Notification of fellowship recipients will occur by December 13.

YMRP Applications Are Open!

From the installation Faces of PRH by Caroline Ryan, Summer Studios 2016

From the installation Faces of PRH by Caroline Ryan, Summer Studios 2016

Apply to YMRP

To apply for an opening in YMRP, please download the application and submit a completed copy to ymrp@projectrowhouses.org.

About the Young Mothers Program

The purpose of YMRP is to empower low-income single mothers and their children in achieving independent, self-sufficient lives. Through this program, PRH provides a culturally rich environment in which residents develop healthy, holistic living practices and cultivate a sense of positive energy and self-worth that will guide them in becoming empowered, self-confident, nurturing women, mothers, daughters, companions, and employees. 

YMRP is geared towards young mothers with ambition and goals for themselves and for each member of their family, who believe they will benefit from a structured program. The goals of the program are to strengthen the self in the following key areas:

  • Academic Excellence
  • Career Development
  • Financial Management
  • Parental Responsibility
  • Emotional/Physical/Spiritual Awareness
  • Relationship Building

Program Requirements

To be eligible for YMRP, applicants must:

  • Be a single mother between the ages of 18 and 26.
  • Have physical custody of at least one (1) of their children under the age of 17.
  • Have all children enrolled and regularly attending a public/private school and daycare classes.
  • Be employed either part-time or full-time.
  • Have income documented by independent sources such as Social Security, pay stubs, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Food Stamps award letters, etc. and must be current at the time of admission.
  • Be pursuing their education either part-time or full-time in two or four-year college or university and/or accredited training program (wielding, cosmetology, CNA). 
  • Be in good academic standing with the college or university she is currently attending and maintaining a grade point average of 2.5 both for the semester and overall.
  • Honor YMRP schedule program commitments, including weekly meetings, programs and volunteer opportunities that support a year-long focus on self, family, and community growth.
  • Be willing to interview with the YMRP Committee members and program staff.
  • Provide a current, official transcript at the time of the interview. 
  • Project Row Houses cannot accept women who are pregnant or suffering from mental illness or drug/alcohol addiction into YMRP.

 

CityLab: Travel Like You Live Here: Houston

Full article by Shannon Sims


Ryan Dennis knows Houston. She is the public art director of Project Row Houses, an arts nonprofit that has acted as a hub for urban art and architecture projects in the city. It's based in the Third Ward, a historically African-American neighborhood that was relatively unscathed by Hurricane Harvey earlier this summer.

Although she's originally from Houston, Dennis, a curator, spent a few years in New York City earning her graduate degree and working at the Museum of African Art. She's also got some community organizing experience under her belt, and now at Project Row Houses her job is to keep her finger on the pulse of Houston's cultural scene. So who better to offer up a guided tour of the country’s fourth-largest city—especially as it continues to rebuild?