PaperCity: Houston’s Jazz Church Searches for a Home

Full Article by Catherine Anspon


The entire night feels as uplifting as a Sunday service. We have just had an encounter at The Jazz Church of Houston, a temporary museum and performance venue Malone has carved out on his own dime as part of the latest round of art installations, “Local Impact,” at Project Row Houses. The evening, billed as “Jazz and the Word,” is edged with a touch of community and a sense of the sacred.

Malone is a respected mid-career Houston painter known for his nuanced text works, which bear fragments of words that allude to album covers or the remembered refrains of a jazz song. The visual talent also spins vinyl as a DJ with his own radio show, Mondays (9 am to noon) on the Pacifica station KPFT, 90.1 FM. But it’s with this creation for Row Houses that Malone has reached the next level — and his truest calling, bringing seekers to the altar of jazz — through performers, poets, and prized ephemera preserved from the past.

Houston Chronicle: Artists honor music as gateway to expression

Full article by Molly Glentzer


His deliberately informal "Jazz Church" leads visitors on a ramble through several rooms that mix his own work with album covers, concert fliers, news clippings and other ephemera - a riot of information that could provide a pretty rich education, if you had time to absorb it all.

Malone also has organized a few intimate, live performances in the space, limiting the free tickets to 35 seats, "so people can feel like they've won the lottery," he said.

Houstonia: The Jazz Church of Houston Highlights Bayou City Musicians

Full article by Chris Becker


IT’S A CHILLY SUNDAY NIGHT IN DECEMBER, and Project Row Houses—the community-based arts organization in the Third Ward—is hopping, specifically the row house currently christened The Jazz Church of Houston.

On a custom-built stage inside the small shotgun house, Houston bassist Marcos Varela leads his swinging quartet with tunes from his album San Ygnacio. It’s standing-room-only in the 30-seat venue, which is part art installation, part history museum and part juke joint. Varela, a graduate of the city’s celebrated High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, is just one of many Houston musicians, poets and activists who have appeared at The Jazz Church of Houston since it opened in September 2016.