Houston Press: Project Row Houses Brings Night Bakery, Pics For Prison Moms and Chill House

Full article by Susie Tommaney


Feeling stressed about 24/7 technology or worried about getting hooked on drugs? Stop by artist Lisa Harris's "House of Practice" installation at Project Row Houses to unplug from social media, chill out with some calming colors, and learn how to "just say no" to Big Pharma.

Harris is one of seven artists participating in Round 48: "Beyond Social Practice" at the shotgun-style Art Houses on Holman. An artist from New Orleans, jackie sumell, hopes to call attention to the fact that 80 percent of incarcerated females are mothers by inviting visitors to plant seedlings and share pictures of that plant's transformation with those mothers through a prisoner-support app.

Houston Press: Have You Heard? Something Magical is Happening in the Third Ward This Fall

Full article by Susie Tommaney


Psst. Have you heard? In a modern twist on an old telephone game, three magical pay phones with mysterious properties have popped up in Houston's Third Ward.

The magic isn't that they're free, though that part is cool. Walk up to one phone, press the handset to ear, push a button and voila: the unmistakable sound of a Third Ward rapper. Dubbed El Mix-Tape, this phone not only functions as a jukebox — with recordings by Brandon Willis, Jewetta Boney, T Lee, Blessed Child 100, Global Gospel's Stacey, Jalen Baker, Roderick Felder and J Free — but also allows the user to make a recording.

"The innards have been reprogrammed. Pop in an SD card and change the recordings," says Jeanette Degollado, one of the collaborators on this Project Row Houses public art installation. "One through nine is a different track or recording. The pound is record, the zero is playback. One can record their voice, rap music or speak over field recordings. The star is the colophon that thanks the sponsors and partners."

Houston Press: Project Row Houses Celebrates 25 Years With a Tour of Iconic Public Art

Full article by Susie Tommaney


To everybody else it was just a row of rundown shotgun houses at the corner of Holman and Dowling (now Emancipation) in the heart of Houston's African American community. But for seven visionary artists, they saw real potential where others only saw poverty.

And the idea for what would become Project Row Houses was born from the dreams of Jesse Lott, Rick Lowe, Bert Samples, Floyd Newsum, George Smith, James Bettison and Bert Long, Jr. Twenty-five years later PRH covers five city blocks in Houston's historic Third Ward, houses 39 structures and has become a difference-maker for art and artists in Houston.