PaperCity: Houston’s Famed Project Row Houses Celebrate a Major Milestone

Full article by Mathew Ramirez and Catherine Anspon


What: Project Row Houses’ 25th Anniversary Gala

Where: Cherie Flores Garden Pavilion and Celebration Gardens at Hermann Park

PC Moments: Commemorating a quarter-century mixing community development and showcasing cutting-edge and/or emerging talent, Project Row Houses toasted to its 25th anniversary with more than 270 supporters and devotees in attendance. PRH’s innovative concept — co-founded by Rick Lowe  who has been recognized with a MacArthur “Genius” Grant for birthing Row Houses — has seen the nonprofit climb from humble beginnings in the Third Ward to the front of Houston’s art scene, while garnering respect nationally and across the pond. (For more about PRH’s 25-year ascent, read PaperCity‘s exclusive profiles with three women who steer it now, here.)

PaperCity: Houston’s Most Successful Community Experiment — the Real Story of Project Row Houses And the Three Wonder Women Charged With Keeping the Magic Going

Full article by Catherine Anspon


The Torch is Passed

Meet three women who are propelling Project Row Houses forward. Our Q&A with executive director Eureka Gilkey, curator and programs director Ryan N. Dennis, and 2018 UH CASE + PRH Fellow Regina Agu follows, a PaperCity exclusive.

Houstonia: Project Row Houses Trains Its Lens on the Third Ward

Full article by Shafaq Patel


WHEN BRIAN ELLISON MOVED FROM TULSA TO HOUSTON EIGHT YEARS AGO, he was in search of a community that felt like home—until he got to the Third Ward. That’s where he found a welcoming community where strangers wave at each other, neighbors know one another, and business owners in establishments like NuWaters Co-Op and Crumbville remember their customers. All of this reminded Ellison of what he had back in Oklahoma, and he said he wanted to show the beauty he experienced in the neighborhood. So, he directed A Day in the Tr3.

His seven-minute film follows a young man named Dominique Elam through the gentrifying Third Ward while capturing scenes of everyday beauty like elders playing dominoes on the porch, a woman dancing in church, and the ubiquitous rubble that piled up after Harvey. He shot the film as part of his artist residency program at Project Row Houses, the storied Third Ward organization that’s used its smattering of row homes as a neighborhood center for museum-quality galleries, affordable housing, a small-business incubator, and more for 25 years.

Houston Press: Project Row Houses Celebrates 25 Years With a Tour of Iconic Public Art

Full article by Susie Tommaney


To everybody else it was just a row of rundown shotgun houses at the corner of Holman and Dowling (now Emancipation) in the heart of Houston's African American community. But for seven visionary artists, they saw real potential where others only saw poverty.

And the idea for what would become Project Row Houses was born from the dreams of Jesse Lott, Rick Lowe, Bert Samples, Floyd Newsum, George Smith, James Bettison and Bert Long, Jr. Twenty-five years later PRH covers five city blocks in Houston's historic Third Ward, houses 39 structures and has become a difference-maker for art and artists in Houston.

PaperCity: Houston’s Under-the-Radar Art Havens

Full article by Annie Gallay


This inspired arts organization is intrinsically tied to its home, the Third Ward. Seven African-American artists launched the creative community 25 years ago. Their vision transformed a row of dilapidated shotgun houses along Holman into vibrant arts venues that defy conventional exhibition definitions.

Exhibition space typically refers to a traditional, formal white cube, Project Row Houses curator Ryan N. Dennis notes. At Project Row Houses, the exhibitions are called “rounds,” and they’re extremely informal and open-ended.

“They’re very diverse,” Dennis says. “The beautiful thing about the installations is that those houses transform to include films, paintings, sculpture, photography. All different types of mediums exist there.”