Houston Chronicle: Art Daybook: Third Ward as Monopoly game

Full article by Molly Glentzer


The current round of installations, "The Act of Doing," examines how the 2-year-old Emancipation Economic Development Council, which the Project co-founded, is dealing with rapid gentrification. One house contains an informative and dense timeline display. Nikita Hodge's Tre Chic pop-up boutique occupies another house, selling goods by black artists and artisans on Saturdays. Several of the other houses feature evocative video installations.

But Newsome hits it out of the park - passing "Go" and then some - by presenting the story of Third Ward's real-estate scramble as a Monopoly game.

Newsome calls himself a smart-aleck with a weird sense of humor. But the pain of this satirical game is real. He grew up in Third Ward, returned as an adult and bought his own fixer-upper home on Southmore about 12 years ago. That place, where he's invested so much sweat equity, now costs him more every year in property taxes, as values skyrocket.

Houston Chronicle: Regina Agu gets the drift at Project Row Houses

Full article by Molly Glentzer


Regina Agu's minimal and elegant "Sargassum" installation at Project Row Houses quietly consumes the single-room space at 2511 Holman with an 80-foot curtain that wraps around three walls, containing a panoramic photographic print of a grass-lined beach.

The title hints that this isn't just an inventive way to display a landscape: Sargassum is the genus of brown seaweed that Galveston visitors know all too well.

The image is printed on billboard vinyl, a material that's also used to advertise seaside attractions. It depicts four experimental sand dunes Texas A&M environmental scientists built on East Beach after the massive seaweed invasion of 2014, studying ways to use the invasive plants as a tool for slowing erosion.

Houston Chronicle: Artists honor music as gateway to expression

Full article by Molly Glentzer


His deliberately informal "Jazz Church" leads visitors on a ramble through several rooms that mix his own work with album covers, concert fliers, news clippings and other ephemera - a riot of information that could provide a pretty rich education, if you had time to absorb it all.

Malone also has organized a few intimate, live performances in the space, limiting the free tickets to 35 seats, "so people can feel like they've won the lottery," he said.

Houston Chronicle: Jesse Lott always has a hand in the action

Full article by Molly Glentzer


Jesse Lott's own hands are large and strong, on the slender side, with long fingers and nails that reflect years of an artist's tedious work with metal and wood.

The hands he creates - the ones that are a significant element of his sculptures and drawings - are almost always spread wide, expressing an indomitable human spirit.

The colorful characters he summons forth in his sculptures have highly expressive faces, arms and legs - you sense history, hardship and dignity coursing through their veins. But the hands, which are never the same, make your heart sing.